Tag Archives: fraud

Skype worm spreading fast

Ransom by redtype

Ransom by redtype


 
It’s Monday morning and the bleary-eyed start of a new week. Criminals are taking advantage of our post-weekend lassitude by starting a Skype based campaign aimed at spreading malicious software.
 
Many users have reported receiving messages from friends in their Skype contact lists. So far, socially-engineered messages have been seen in both English and (Bavarian accented (seems my German accent recognition is way off “Moin” is north German, thanks guys )) German, saying either:
 

“lol is this your new profile pic? h__p://goo.gl/{BLOCKED}5q1sx?img=username”

 
or
 

“moin, kaum zu glauben was für schöne fotos von dir auf deinem profil h__p://goo.gl/{BLOCKED}5q1sx?img=username”

 

Regardless of the language used, the link is the same, although of course this can easily be modified. The shortened URL eventually redirects to a download on hotfile.com which pulls down an archive named “Skype_todaysdate.zip” containing a single executable file of the same name. We detect this initial downloader as TROJ_DLOADER.IF
 
The executable installs a variant of the Dorkbot worm, detected as WORM_DORKBOT.IF or WORM_DORKBOT.DN respectively. On installation, this worm may initiate large scale click-fraud activity on each compromised machine, recruiting it into a botnet.
 
These Dorkbot variants will also steal user name and password credentials for a vast array of websites including Facebook, Twitter, Google, PayPal, NetFlix and many others. They can interfere in DNS resolution, insert iFrames into web pages, perform three different kinds of DDoS attack, act as a Proxy server and download and install further malware at the botmaster’s initiation. These are only some of the functionality of this pernicious worm, in the 24 hours since discovery, Trend Micro have blocked more than 2800 associated files.
 
Some infections will subsequently install a ransomware variant locking the user out of their machine, informing them that their files have been encrypted and that they will be subsequently deleted unless the unfortunate victim surrenders a $200 fine within 48 hours.

 

This malware is still under investigation and TrendLabs have posted initial findings here. Until then, please remember not to click on unexpected links, no matter how bleary-eyed you may be.

 

The reality of mobile compromise

Corporate espionage has never been so easy. See how a simple app can transform a smartphone into an espionage tool in the hands of criminals, able to record conversations, steal text messages and spy on private meetings.
 

 

Phishing for Apples in the Cloud

Apple customers in the UK and Australia are being targeted in a convincing-looking phishing scam with a cloudy twist.
 
Criminals are sending out targeted emails promising a “Discount Card” as a “reward to long-term customers“. This non-existent card supposedly offers £100 or $100 of credit at any Apple store, for the low-low price of just £9. As you can see below, the email contains enough location and currency specific information to make it more credible.
 

Phishing mail out to steal your personal info


 
Of course the card does not exist and will never be delivered. Instead of a link to a phishing site, the mail contains an html attachment, again convincing looking, using Apple style sheets. The criminals ask for a slew of personal and financial information including name, address, drivers licence number, date of birth, credit card number, expiry date, security code and sort code. Quite enough for some serious financial fraud.
 

Submit!


 
Instead of this stolen information being directly uploaded to a criminal or compromised server, the big blue Submit button POSTs the data to a server in Amazon’s EC2 cloud as shown below with dummy data. Once the data has been successfully sent to the criminal server, the browser is redirected to the official Apple web site.
 

Captured traffic from the phishing attack


 
This cleverly crafted and targeted attack may well be enough to fool the unwary, and it’s abuse of commercial cloud infrastructure will make it much more likely to overcome URL blocking security mechanisms.
 
I have informed Amazon of this abuse of their services, but in the meantime remember, there’s no such thing as an “Apple Discount Card”.
 
Never respond to unsolicited email, never open files attached to unsolicited email and never enter personal data on anything other than an SSL encrypted web site (one where the address starts with “https://“). If you do receive an email making you an offer you can’t refuse, do not follow links in the mail, but contact the vendor directly either by typing in their web address or using the good old telephone.