Category Archives: Underground Economy

TalkTalk – The case for a Chief Security Officer

 

unnamed-1While the importance of the Chief Information Security Officer has been in constant growth over the past few years, organisations that employ a CISO/CSO are still far too few.

As the latest breach at broadband provider TalkTalk descends slowly into farce, the perils of relying on the CEO to fill these shoes become apparent. Almost one week on from the initial attack many important questions still remain unanswered or answered in unacceptably vague or contradictory terms.

The “significant and sustained” attack against TalkTalk was initially characterised as a Distributed Denial of Service attack. Commentators rightly pointed out that a DDoS in itself does not lead to information theft and that there must have been another element to it. Later reports appear to confirm that the theft was the result of a simple SQL injection attack. At a technology company! Affecting 4m people! In 2015!

TalkTalk are still unable to confirm which and how much data was encrypted. In addition to personal information including name, address, date of birth and email address, the breach also exposed financial data. The CEO initially said that they “didn’t know” if this data was encrypted or not (How can this be the case?). Now, it appears that “only” the first and last digits of credit card data may have been exposed. Of course this still carries risk, think how often those “last four digits” are requested as verification data. Since then Baroness Harding has even gone as far as the last refuge of the wicked, legislation, claiming in an interview with The Sunday Times (paywalled) that TalkTalk is under no obligation to encrypt credit card data. Really? I think that the PCI-DSS may well dispute that point with you, not to mention your customers.

Ah yes, the customers… Those four million people who will now be finding that their names, addresses, contact information and dates of birth are far more difficult to change than their credit card details (or their broadband provider) and that a year of free credit-monitoring involves entrusting yet another corporate with all their extremely sensitive information.

The handling of the breach illustrates that the role of the CISO is never a purely technical one; the CISO also owns the breach response plan, an important aspect of which has nothing to do with technology and everything to do with communications. How do you inform your customers and when? How do you engage law enforcement or forensics? What information do you need always to have to hand about the care and sensitivity with which you treat the information that has been entrusted to your organisation and how do you sensitively, accurately and promptly convey this?

Rule 1: It’s not all about you. To say, “I’m a customer myself of TalkTalk. I’ve been a victim of this attack” is crass and insensitive in the extreme. To include an assertion in your FAQ that you have not breached the Data Protection Act is both short-sighted and ill-informed, as I addressed in this piece for The Guardian.

This apparent lack of plan, this visible lack of any senior Information Security management team could well be the eventual downfall of TalkTalk, time, the markets, the regulators and their customers will decide. We could be watching the first major corporate disintegration as a result of data breach. Welcome to the future.

So, assuming you have or are planning to hire a CISO, to whom should they report? In too many organisations the CISO is still reporting to the CIO despite the frequent pitfalls. This reporting structure can be counter-productive. The question of reporting lines is often a source of friction and can really only be answered if you have managed to effectively differentiate and delineate your CIO and CISO roles.

Job descriptions are slippery amorphous things, so in the interest of impartiality I’ll use Wikipedia’s definition. CIO is “a job title commonly given to the most senior executive in an enterprise responsible for the information technology and computer systems that support enterprise goals”, whereas CISO “is the senior-level executive within an organization responsible for establishing and maintaining the enterprise vision, strategy and program to ensure information assets are adequately protected”.

When put this simply, the conflict of interest in having a CISO report to a CIO becomes very clear. The person responsible for ensuring organisational information security can not be subordinated to the person responsible for technology selection and implementation. Rather the two should operate as a team, driving operational and information security up the boardroom agenda. An effective CIO/CISO team will take board level strategic directions and translate them into technological and process requirements for the organisation. The CIO ensures that best of breed technologies are selected and architected in the most operationally beneficial manner, the CISO ensuring that those technologies meet the security requirements of the business on an ongoing basis; neither one being able to pull rank on the other.

In the case of a conflict arising between the two, which cannot be resolved through discussion the final say must comes down to business risk and operations, requiring the involvement of COO, CRO or even CEO depending on the organisational structure.

Security should be a regular boardroom agenda item and it is only through the checks and balances of the independent CIO and CISO that it can be effectively addressed.

The Security of the Small Business

Image by Charlie, used under Creative Commons

In the United Kingdom, as in many other economies around the world, smaller businesses are the lifeblood of national prosperity. In essence SMEs *are* the private sector, according to the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills, they employ more people (60% in the UK in 2014) and generate almost half the total turnover of the private sector (48% in the UK in 2014).

Given the importance of these businesses to the UK economy, Trend Micro decided to attempt to discover just how ready many of these businesses are for the potentially devastating consequences of compromise.

Small businesses represent an attractive target for online criminals for several reasons; of course many of them hold or process a large amount of personal information, identities, legal, financial and medical records just for example. They also have less convoluted financial and banking arrangements, making them easier to exploit with traditional banking malware whilst also being less likely to be compensated for any fraudulent transactions. Quite aside from the dangers of information or financial theft, small and medium businesses are increasingly in the sights of sophisticated criminals looking for ways into larger organisations. In an attack technique that has become known as “island hopping“, determined attackers seek out the smaller business partners of their eventual target in the hope that they will be less security savvy and less well-protected. Fazio Mechanical Services has become the unfortunate poster child of the island hopping attack ever since it was used as a stepping stone to the huge Target data breach in late 2013.

So what did we discover?

We interviewed 500 key decision makers and business owners in UK SMEs to compile the research. Amazingly, only half of them said they rely on internet security tools to protect their organisation from cyber attack. In addition, just 44% said they knew how to check if their laptops, mobiles or tablets had been infected with malware. Three-quarters (74%) admitted to not fully understanding the legal implications of a cyber attack, while 67% said the same was true of the financial implications of an attack.

Tellingly, just 18% said they thought their data was worth stealing.

What now?

It isn’t only the internet security industry that is sounding the alarm and offering assistance to SMEs. The UK government too has recognised the threat. Last month Ed Vaizey, the Digital Economy Minister outlined how the voucher scheme, operated by the government’s Technology Strategy Board,  Innovate UK would be extended to cover cybersecurity. This scheme offers businesses the chance to apply for £5000 in funding for specialist advice to help better secure their businesses and digital assets. Unfortunately right now there isn’t enough in the pot to cover every application, so lucky recipients are selected in a random draw on a quarterly basis, still as they say, you’ve got to be in it to win it…

in the meantime the key to online security lies in the selection of a trusted security partner. As a small business, your core skills are not in cyber security or network or system administration. You are focussed on growing your business, on being succesful and on being the best in your field, and rightly so.

There are other small and medium businesses like yours who are striving to be the best in their field too and their field is security. A specialist partner, providing a managed security service, will be able to provide you with the assurance and peace of mind that you need to focus all your efforts on success and who knows… You may even get the funding!

The research was conducted on behalf of Trend Micro via Vital Statistics – sampled 500 UK business owners and decision makers in August 2015.

Small Business Advice Week runs from 31st August -6th September 2015. More information can be found here: www.smallbusinessadviceweek.co.uk

It’s not my birthday

Flickr image by andrewmalone used under Creative Commons

I arrived in the office this morning to find a slew of birthday greetings awaiting me, both on Skype and even in direct message form on Twitter, where I was told that my birthday was appearing in someone’s calendar and they had no idea why. For a second I was confused, until my other half told me of her moment of abject fear that she had forgotten my birthday when she logged into Skype, the the proverbial penny dropped.

Like the queen, I have two birthdays each year, my real one and my Skype birthday and there is a good reason for this. Skype decided long ago that certain parts of your Skype profile information should be publicly available and Microsoft have continued this tradition. The privacy settings of these data items are non-configurable, this data comprises your first and last names, gender, detailed location and date of birth which taken together easily constitute “Personally Identifiable Information” under whichever jurisdiction you care to mention.

Whilst is is not compulsory to enter your date of birth on Skype in order to operate an account you are certainly encouraged to do so, whether that be by the “Profile completeness” tips (you get and extra 10% for your birthday!) or the bald invitation to “Add your birthday”. However it is not made clear when you add this data that it will only ever have a privacy setting of “Public”. Once you discover this, no doubt you will want to remove your date of birth, but the interface seems designed to fool you into thinking that this is nether possible nor wise

Skype Date of Birth

“It’s a Security Thing”… It sure is!

Nonetheless it is entirely possible, and advisable to reset this information to read simply “Day”, “Month” & “Year” and to remove your birthdate from the public domain. Either that or elect to have a second alternate birthday, just like I did. I haven’t got any presents yet, but the attention on this Monday morning is lovely.

Of course your friends and people you trust need to know your birthday, otherwise how are you ever going to get the full set of Iron Maiden reissues as birthday presents (true story) but unfortunately information such as date of birth is still all too often used as important security information or qualifying information to apply for identity documents and should not be broadcast so widely. In the words of the New York State Police

“All an identity thief needs is any combination of your Social Security number, birth date, address, and phone number.”

We can argue the pure logic of their claim (“any combination?” surely not) but the fact remains any information given freely, particularly in context increases your risk of identity theft or fraud. If you think that enterprising online criminals are not really interested in this stuff, think again, as much as five years ago they were already referring to Facebook as a “Free DOB Lookup Service”, of course that got resolved but we all know that scammers actively solicit contacts on Skype already and accepting the connection request is all it takes to give away your personal information.

Criminal forum post from 2009

Criminal forum post from 2009

We live in an age where everything is increasingly connected to everything else; accounts, applications, APIs, credentials devices and personal details and more. The less you broadcast, the more you can begin the long process of reclaiming ownership over your own identity. A process which for most of us, is long overdue.