Category Archives: malware

The Security of the Small Business

Image by Charlie, used under Creative Commons

In the United Kingdom, as in many other economies around the world, smaller businesses are the lifeblood of national prosperity. In essence SMEs *are* the private sector, according to the Department for Business, Innovation & Skills, they employ more people (60% in the UK in 2014) and generate almost half the total turnover of the private sector (48% in the UK in 2014).

Given the importance of these businesses to the UK economy, Trend Micro decided to attempt to discover just how ready many of these businesses are for the potentially devastating consequences of compromise.

Small businesses represent an attractive target for online criminals for several reasons; of course many of them hold or process a large amount of personal information, identities, legal, financial and medical records just for example. They also have less convoluted financial and banking arrangements, making them easier to exploit with traditional banking malware whilst also being less likely to be compensated for any fraudulent transactions. Quite aside from the dangers of information or financial theft, small and medium businesses are increasingly in the sights of sophisticated criminals looking for ways into larger organisations. In an attack technique that has become known as “island hopping“, determined attackers seek out the smaller business partners of their eventual target in the hope that they will be less security savvy and less well-protected. Fazio Mechanical Services has become the unfortunate poster child of the island hopping attack ever since it was used as a stepping stone to the huge Target data breach in late 2013.

So what did we discover?

We interviewed 500 key decision makers and business owners in UK SMEs to compile the research. Amazingly, only half of them said they rely on internet security tools to protect their organisation from cyber attack. In addition, just 44% said they knew how to check if their laptops, mobiles or tablets had been infected with malware. Three-quarters (74%) admitted to not fully understanding the legal implications of a cyber attack, while 67% said the same was true of the financial implications of an attack.

Tellingly, just 18% said they thought their data was worth stealing.

What now?

It isn’t only the internet security industry that is sounding the alarm and offering assistance to SMEs. The UK government too has recognised the threat. Last month Ed Vaizey, the Digital Economy Minister outlined how the voucher scheme, operated by the government’s Technology Strategy Board,  Innovate UK would be extended to cover cybersecurity. This scheme offers businesses the chance to apply for £5000 in funding for specialist advice to help better secure their businesses and digital assets. Unfortunately right now there isn’t enough in the pot to cover every application, so lucky recipients are selected in a random draw on a quarterly basis, still as they say, you’ve got to be in it to win it…

in the meantime the key to online security lies in the selection of a trusted security partner. As a small business, your core skills are not in cyber security or network or system administration. You are focussed on growing your business, on being succesful and on being the best in your field, and rightly so.

There are other small and medium businesses like yours who are striving to be the best in their field too and their field is security. A specialist partner, providing a managed security service, will be able to provide you with the assurance and peace of mind that you need to focus all your efforts on success and who knows… You may even get the funding!

The research was conducted on behalf of Trend Micro via Vital Statistics – sampled 500 UK business owners and decision makers in August 2015.

Small Business Advice Week runs from 31st August -6th September 2015. More information can be found here:

TV5 Monde, Russia and the CyberCaliphate

Image credit Steven Depolo used under Creative Commons

Image credit Steven Depolo used under Creative Commons

Yesterday evening French magazine L’Express published a report linking an attack against TV5 Monde very firmly to the Russian state. The attack, which knocked 11 of its global channels off air for a period of time and resulted in a compromised website and Facebook page, took place back in April.

At the time when the attack took place, a group calling itself CyberCaliphate immediately took responsibility for the hack and went on to publish details purportedly of serving French military personnel involved in the struggle against Islamic State or ISIS. The attribution at the time seems simple and immediate; Islamic Extremist motivated hacktivism.

L’Express approached Trend Micro with certain indicators of compromise which had been shared with 43 media organisations by the Agence nationale de la sécurité des systèmes d’information (ANSSI) in France, with a view to uncovering more about the attacker or the motivations behind the attack. These indicators very definitely evidence an infestation of Sednit (also known as Sofacy) malware, associated with the ongoing targeted attack campaigns by the Pawn Storm operators (also referred to as APT28). What they did not do was to definitively link the stolen information or compromised accounts from the April attack to this Pawn Storm compromise. Neither is it possible to state with certainty that the two are *not* related.

Attribution in online crime is complex, more so when there may be nation-state involvement. Trend Micro’s assessment of the current possibilities, with reference to the facts as they stand today leaves us with three possibilities.

1 – We could be looking at two entirely unrelated incidents, a Pawn Storm infestation and a separate hactivist compromise
2 – Perhaps the Pawn Storm group gave attack relevant data to a third party, directly or indirectly to islamic hactivists. While possible, this would seem highly unlikely as we have seen Pawn Storm actively targeting Chechen separatists and Islamic extremists in former Yugoslavia
3 – Finally, the Pawn Storm group carried out a highly visible website, Facebook and TV network compromise (which would be extremely out of character) and used it as a false flag operation to lay the blame at the door of islamic extremists.

While the false flag option is not entirely out of the question, it is at least somewhat out of character of previous operations of the Pawn Storm campaign. My spider senses right now are tingling on option one. TV5 Monde, as a media operation is a target entirely within the remit of the regular Pawn Storm operations and an infestation of Sednit malware there should perhaps not be a surprise at all. The fact that during the time of this Sednit compromise, they were also targeted by Islamic extremist hacktivists, given the contemporary news and political environment in France is perhaps also not surprising.

Attribution online is always complex, sometimes though things can be entirely as they seem.

It’s time to quarantine infected computers

Image credit: Roy Costello used under Creative Commons

Image credit: Roy Costello used under Creative Commons

Quarantine is a word derived from the the 17th century Venetian for 40 (quaranta). The purpose of quarantine is to separate and restrict the movement of otherwise healthy organisms who may have been exposed to disease, to see if they become ill. The 40 day period was designed to identify carriers of the Bubonic plague or Black Death, before they could go ashore and spread the contagion more widely.  Desperate times call for desperate measures, nevertheless the concept was widely adopted and remains with us to this day.

The word quarantine has been thoroughly misused by the well-meaning security industry, where known infected files or systems are moved to a protected area until they can be examined and cleaned-up. More accurately we should be calling this “isolation” as in most cases we already know the subject to be compromised or infected.  Nonetheless, this serves an equally important purpose of containing the spread of compromise and it’s consequences; abuse of compromised systems for sending Spam, theft of sensitive information and spread of infection just for example.
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